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МИНИСТЕРСТВО ОБРАЗОВАНИЯ И НАУКИ

РЕСПУБЛИКИ КАЗАХСТАН

ГОСУДАРСТВЕННЫЙ УНИВЕРСИТЕТ


имени ШАКАРИМА города Семей

Документ СМК 3 уровня

УМКД
УМКД 042-18-26.1.58/02-2013

Учебно-методические материалы дисциплины «Язык для специальных целей С1-С2»


Редакция №1 от 05.09.08

УЧЕБНО-МЕТОДИЧЕСКИЙ КОМПЛЕКС

ДИСЦИПЛИНЫ

«Язык для специальных целей С1-С2»

для специальности 05В011900 - «Иностранный язык: два иностранных языка»

УЧЕБНО-МЕТОДИЧЕСКИЕ МАТЕРИАЛЫ

Семей

2013

Содержание


1

Глоссарий

3

2

Лекционные занятия

4

3

Самостоятельная работа студента

43

1 ГЛОССАРИЙ


YUCK: a common expression of dislike (Cultural note: This is an expression that is common among friends who are close to your own age and in informal situations.)

TO TAKE A BREAKE: to stop doing something for a period of time, to rest

R and R: rest and relaxation; something relaxing, enjoyable (Originally a military term, R and R has become quite common in casual speech.)

POTLUCK: a meal made from whatever is available or contributed by others (Cultural note: Potlucks are quite common in the United States and do not mean that the person giving the party does not have enough money to pay for everything himself or herself. They are a way of sharing and trying different things.)

HEAVY DUTY: serious; not frivolous

TO SHOW UP: to come, to appear, to arrive

TO THROW TOGETHER: to make in a hurry, often without care (Cultural note: Some people say they “throw something together” when they work very hard on it, but they don’t want to brag or call attention to themselves so they minimize the work involved.)

FANCY: decorated; ornate; not plain, not simple

GONNA: going to (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as going to.)

YEAH: yes (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing it should always be written as yes.)

TO KNOW WHAT SOMETHING IS LIKE: to understand, to be sympathetic to someone

YA: you (Note that the pronunciation is the same as its for yeah. This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as you.)

IT’D: it would (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as it would.)

THAT’D: that would (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as that would.)

WHATDDAYA: what do you (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as what do you.)

GOTTA: (have) go to (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as got to.)

TO GET: (it, something) OUT OF THE WAY: to finish something, to complete it; to put something aside

TO HANDLE (something or someone): to take care of, to deal with, to resolve

TO SET THUNGS (SOMESING) UP: to prepare, to organize

I’LL: I will (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech.)

TO LIGHTEN UP: to become less serious; to relax

TO END UP: (ordering): what you finally have or decide to have; what you are left with.

TO BAIL SOMEONE OUT: to help someone when he or she is in trouble; often to help financially or emotionally; to give money to release someone for jail.

FANCY: decorated; ornate; not plain, not simple.

OUT OF MY LEAGUE: something you are not accustomed to; something that often feels too sophisticated, advanced, or difficult.

TO MAKE RESERVATIONS: to make arrangements ahead of time; to telephone the place you are going to in advance in order to set a specific time for you to arrive.

SPUR OF THE MOMENT: without forethought; a decision to do something that has not been carefully planned or prearranged.

TO HESITATE: to wait before you do or say something

RED SNAPPER: a kind of ocean fish especially popular, as food, on the West Coast

TO BE ALL OUT OF SOMETHING: not to have any more of something

MENU: a written list of food, drinks, and prices in a restaurant

YOU’VE GOT IT! : you understand!

WEIRD: strange, unusual, unexplainable, disturbing

DEEP-FRIED: cooked in a lot of oil or lard, usually in a deep pan

TENTACLES: long, spider-like arms

OCTOPUS: a sea animal which has eight tentacles

EM: them (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as them.)



BRAVE: not afraid; strong and courageous

A LA CARTE: listed separately on the menu; not a complete meal

TO STARVE: to be very, very hungry; to be without food

THOUSAND ISLAND DRESSING: salad dressing often made of mayonnaise, tomato sauce, pickles, spices, and chopped hard-cooked eggs

BLUE CHEESE DRESSING: salad dressing often made of cheese, sour cream, mayonnaise, blue cheese, and spices

FRENCH DRESSING: salad dressing usually made with oil, vinegar, and spices

HOUSE DRESSING: a specialty of a particular restaurant, not always the same

TO BE KIDDING: to be pretending, joking, fooling

ESCARGOTS: a French word for small snails usually cooked in a sauce of white wine, butter, garlic, and parsley

TO HAVE COURAGE: to be brave; to have strength

ENCOURAGE: to make someone feel better; to help someone feel he or she can do something

SLIMY: covered with a mucous secretion; slippery

SHELL: a hard or tough outer covering; a framework or exterior cover

TO TAKEN IN: to go see; to look at

TO FORK OUT BIG BUCKS: to spend a lot of money

MA’AM: a contraction of madam; commonly used as a polite manner of address to a woman who is older than you are (Note: Ma’am is a more common manner of address in Southern dialects than in Northern dialects of American English.)

GRUMPY: to be unhappy or unpleasant

YELLOW PAGES: the part of the telephone book which has advertisements for businesses and services

TO TRANSFER: to send from one place to another

COULD’VE: could have (this is common in fast, casual speech. )

TAKE IT EASY: relax; calm down; don’t worry

TRAFFIC: movement of cars, buses, trucks, ships, planes, or other vehicles in or through a certain area

TO CONNECT WITH: to meet; to contact; to get together with

NOT TO WORRY: don’t worry

TO KICK BACK: to relax; to take it easy

A SEC: a second; a very short period of time (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as a second.)

D’YA: do you (This is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as do you.)

GOTTA: (have) got to (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as got to.)

TO MAKE IT: to be on time; to get something gone or go somewhere when you want (in time)

WE’VE: we have (This is common in fast, casual speech)

TO LIVE AND LEARN: to learn more as you get older

TO BE ON THE SAFE SIDE: to be careful; to protect yourself

THERE’RE: there are (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as there are)

REMODELING: fixing something up; changing something to make it make it better, newer, more convenient.

2. ТӘЖІРИБЕЛІК САБАҚ
1. Тәжірибелік сабақ. Chapter I. «THE POTLUCK»
Сабақтың мақсаты: қойылған сұрақтарға жауап беру және тәжірибелік тапсырмалырда орындай алуы, тындаған диалог тың мазмұнын түсіне білу тиіс .
Әдістемелік нұсқаулар:

  1. Прослушайте и переведите Диалогты тындау.

  2. Выучите слова и выражения после текста в разделе Vocabulary.

  3. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Comprehension.

  4. Письменно выполните упражнения в разделе Word Study.

  5. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Speech Practice.

Содержание практического занятия:



General warmup questions

Read the following questions before you begin. They will help you to focus on the topic covered in this chapter.


Do you like to study? Many people have one particular place where they like to study.

Where do you usually study? Is it easy for you to study when there is music playing or when the television is on? Do you like to study alone? What kinds of things do you like to do when you have finished studying?

Who does most of the cooking in your household? Do you like to cook? Do you think you are a good cook? Do your friends think you are a good cook? When you get together with your friends and you are asked to bring something to eat, do you prepare something special, or do you pick up something at the store? Have you ever been to a potluck? When you go to a potluck, what do you like to bring?
Prelistening/Reading Study Questions

Read the following questions before you listen to or read the dialogue. Take a few moments to think about them. They will help you understand the dialogue when you begin.


What does Fred have to study? What is Sharon making for the potluck? What should Fred bring to the potluck? Do you think that he likes to dance? Why? When will Sharon go to the party? When is it important to be on time for a party?
Vocabulary
YUCK: a common expression of dislike (Cultural note: This is an expression that is common among friends who are close to your own age and in informal situations.)

TO TAKE A BREAKE: to stop doing something for a period of time, to rest

R and R: rest and relaxation; something relaxing, enjoyable (Originally a military term, R and R has become quite common in casual speech.)

POTLUCK: a meal made from whatever is available or contributed by others (Cultural note: Potlucks are quite common in the United States and do not mean that the person giving the party does not have enough money to pay for everything himself or herself. They are a way of sharing and trying different things.)

HEAVY DUTY: serious; not frivolous

TO SHOW UP: to come, to appear, to arrive

TO THROW TOGETHER: to make in a hurry, often without care (Cultural note: Some people say they “throw something together” when they work very hard on it, but they don’t want to brag or call attention to themselves so they minimize the work involved.)

FANCY: decorated; ornate; not plain, not simple

GONNA: going to (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as going to.)

YEAH: yes (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing it should always be written as yes.)

TO KNOW WHAT SOMETHING IS LIKE: to understand, to be sympathetic to someone

YA: you (Note that the pronunciation is the same as its for yeah. This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as you.)

IT’D: it would (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as it would.)

THAT’D: that would (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as that would.)

WHATDDAYA: what do you (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as what do you.)

GOTTA: (have) go to (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as got to.)

TO GET: (it, something) OUT OF THE WAY: to finish something, to complete it; to put something aside

TO HANDLE (something or someone): to take care of, to deal with, to resolve

TO SET THUNGS (SOMESING) UP: to prepare, to organize

I’LL: I will (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech.)

TO LIGHTEN UP: to become less serious; to relax
THE POTLUCK

Sharon: What are you gonna do this weekend?

Fred: Nothing special. I have a test to study for in math.

Sharon: Yuck. I hate math.

Fred: It’s not so bad. It just takes a lot of time. I`ve got homework to do every night.

Sharon: I`ve got a chemistry class that`s almost as bad. It seems like I`ve been living in the chem lab lately. I`m ready to take a break! How about some R and R? Speaking of R and R, did John tell you about the party his gonna have this Saturday night?

Fred:Yeah. I`d lke to go, but you know what it`s like. I`ve got a lot of studying to do. It never seems to end.

Sharon: Aw, come on. It`s Saturday night! It`d be good for you to take break all that heavy duty studying for a few hours.

Fred: Well. May be I`ll show up for a little while. It`s a potluck, Isn`t it?

Sharon: Yeah, I think I might make a big fruit salad. Everyone usually likes fruit. I thought I`d just throw together some apples, oranges, bananas, and whatever else is in season or on sale.

Fred: That sound good, but if I come I’m not going to have time to put anything fancy together, and I’m not a good cook anyway.

Sharon: No problem. The whole idea of a potluck is just to bring whatever you can. There are always a few people who have more time and are good cooks to bring main dishes and desserts.

Fred: So whaddaya think I should bring?

Sharon: The important thing is that you come, and that you bring something-anything! You could just bring a loaf of French bread or a bag of potato chips. That’d be fine.

Fred: Hmmm. A loaf of French bread or a bag of potato chips; I can handle that. Sounds pretty easy. Maybe I’ll come after all. I’ll bring some of my tapes, too. I’ve got some great music for dancing. What time does it start?

Sharon: John said something about seven o’clock, but I’ll probably get there a little early. I told him I’d help set things up.

Fred: Ok. If I come I’ll probably be there at about 8 or 8:30. Is that late?

Sharon: Heck no. You’ve only gotta worry about being right on time when someone asks you over for dinner and plans for everything to be ready at exactly the right time.

Fred: Well, if 8 or 8:30. Isn’t too late, I’d really like to come. I think you’re right. I do need to take a break. Besides, if I go home right now, I’ll still have time to get my math lighten up a little bit. I’ll see ya’ there.

Sharon: Great! I’m glad you’ve decided to come. John’s parties are always a lot of fun. See ya’later.
Рекомендуемая литература:

1. Sharon Peters “On a roll” A conversation and listening text, 1991

2. В.К. Мюллер Новый Англо-Русский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2003.

3. В.К. Мюллер Русско-Английский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2002.

4. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. Longman. - 2001.



Практическое занятие 2. Chapter II. “After class
Цель занятия: уметь отвечать на поставленные вопросы и выполнять практические задания, уметь проводить анализ прочитанного произведения
Методические рекомендации:

  1. Прослушайте и переведите диалог.

  2. Выучите слова и выражения после текста в разделе Vocabulary.

  3. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Comprehension.

  4. Письменно выполните упражнения в разделе Word Study.

  5. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Speech Practice.

Содержание практического занятия:


Практическое занятие 3. Chapter III. “Thursday Night at the Supermarket”
Цель занятия: уметь отвечать на поставленные вопросы и выполнять практические задания, уметь проводить анализ прочитанного произведения
Методические рекомендации:

  1. Прочитайте и переведите текст.

  2. Выучите слова и выражения после текста в разделе Vocabulary.

  3. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Comprehension.

  4. Письменно выполните упражнения в разделе Word Study.

  5. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Speech Practice.

Содержание практического занятия:


Рекомендуемая литература:

1. Sharon Peters “On a roll” A conversation and listening text, 1991

2. В.К. Мюллер Новый Англо-Русский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2003.

3. В.К. Мюллер Русско-Английский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2002.

4. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. Longman. - 2001.


Практическое занятие 4. Chapter IV. “Laundromat
Цель занятия: уметь отвечать на поставленные вопросы и выполнять практические задания, уметь проводить анализ прочитанного произведения
Методические рекомендации:

  1. Прочитайте и переведите текст.

  2. Выучите слова и выражения после текста в разделе Vocabulary.

  3. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Comprehension.

  4. Письменно выполните упражнения в разделе Word Study.

  5. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Speech Practice.

Содержание практического занятия:



General Warm-Up Questions

Read the following questions before you begin. They will help you to focus on the topic covered in this chapter.

Many people use public transportation, but others do not. What are some of the advantages of using public transportation? If you live in a city with a good public transportation system, is a car still important? Is the public transportation system in your city good? Do you use public transportation every day? What do you think of the idea of buying a car together with a friend and sharing it? If you could choose any way to travel, how would you travel?

Some things are more difficult to do if you don`t have a car. If you don`t have a car, and you don`t have a washing machine, how do you do your laundry? If you go to a Laundromat, can you do other things while your clothes are washing? What are some other things that you can do?



Prelistening/Reading Study Questions

Read the following questions before you listen to or read the dialogue. Take a few moments to think about them. They will help you understand the dialogue when you begin.

How many loads of wash does Fred have to do? Why does Sharon put off doing her laundry? Why doesn`t Fred have to divide his clothes into separate piles? Does a Big Boy hold more than a regular washing machine? How much does it hold? Why doesn`t Sharon want to use the change machine? What does she buy for Fred at the deli? They plan to go out to lunch on Saturday. Why does Fred think that Sharon should pay for lunch?

Vocabulary

TO GIVE SOMEONE A LIFT: to give someone a ride in a car

A LOAD: the quantity of clothes, towels, and so on that you put into a washing machine or dryer

TO GET DOWN TO NOTHING: to have nothing left that is clean to wear; to have nothing left to eat; to have no money left to spend

TO GET THROUGH: to finish; to comlete

TO PICK (SOMEONE OR SOMETHING) UP: to give someone a ride ;to accompany someone; to get something for someone

TO BE USED TO: to be accustomed to something

TO PUT OFF (doing something): to avoid; to postpone

TO END UP DOING SOMETHING: to do something you did not plan (or want) to do

A LOTTA STUFF: a lot of stuff; lots of possessions; many things. (This expression is common only in casual, informal speech.)

YA`:

THAT`D:

ALL THAT JAZZ:

A GOOG DEAL:

FADED:

A COUPLE OF BUCKS:

A RIP-OFF:

NAH:

YUP:

ORGANIC:

A MONSTER:

TO BREAK A DOLLAR BILL:

A REFUND:

DELI:

TO KEEP AN EYE ON:
Практическое занятие 5. THE RESTAURANT”.
Цель занятия: уметь отвечать на поставленные вопросы и выполнять практические задания, уметь проводить анализ прочитанного диалога.
Методические рекомендации:


  1. Прослушайте и переведите диалог.

  2. Выучите слова и выражения после текста в разделе Vocabulary.

  3. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Comprehension.

  4. Письменно выполните упражнения в разделе Word Study.

  5. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Speech Practice.

Содержание практического занятия:



General Warm-Up Questions

Read the following questions before you begin. They will help you to focus on the topic

covered in this chapter.


How do you feel when you go into a strange place for the first time? Is it different if you are with your friends than with your family? Which is worse? When you are confused, do you think it is better to struggle through by yourself, or have a friend do the talking for you? What do you when you are with a friend who does not speak the language but you do? How does it make you feel when you have to translate for someone?

Some people welcome the challenge of a difficult situation. Other people are more conservative and avoid difficult situations when they can. Do you ever put yourself in a difficult situation on purpose? Do you like to try unusual things?
Prelistening /Reading Study Questions


Read the following questions before you listen to or read the dialogue. Take a few moments to think about them. They will help you understand the dialogue when you begin.

Why doesn’t Sharon like to go to restaurants to eat? What does she usually order when she goes out to eat? What does Fred tell Sharon when she is worried? Do they sit in the smoking or nonsmoking section? When will the waitress come to take their order? Sharon’s grandfather had a different use for squid. How did he use them? What does Sharon say she will order for Fred the next time they go out for dinner?


Vocabulary
TO END UP: (ordering): what you finally have or decide to have; what you are left with.

TO BAIL SOMEONE OUT: to help someone when he or she is in trouble; often to help financially or emotionally; to give money to release someone for jail.

FANCY: decorated; ornate; not plain, not simple.

OUT OF MY LEAGUE: something you are not accustomed to; something that often feels too sophisticated, advanced, or difficult.

TO MAKE RESERVATIONS: to make arrangements ahead of time; to telephone the place you are going to in advance in order to set a specific time for you to arrive.

SPUR OF THE MOMENT: without forethought; a decision to do something that has not been carefully planned or prearranged.

TO HESITATE: to wait before you do or say something

RED SNAPPER: a kind of ocean fish especially popular, as food, on the West Coast

TO BE ALL OUT OF SOMETHING: not to have any more of something

MENU: a written list of food, drinks, and prices in a restaurant

YOU’VE GOT IT! : you understand!

WEIRD: strange, unusual, unexplainable, disturbing

DEEP-FRIED: cooked in a lot of oil or lard, usually in a deep pan

TENTACLES: long, spider-like arms

OCTOPUS: a sea animal which has eight tentacles

EM: them (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should be written as them.)



BRAVE: not afraid; strong and courageous

A LA CARTE: listed separately on the menu; not a complete meal

TO STARVE: to be very, very hungry; to be without food

THOUSAND ISLAND DRESSING: salad dressing often made of mayonnaise, tomato sauce, pickles, spices, and chopped hard-cooked eggs

BLUE CHEESE DRESSING: salad dressing often made of cheese, sour cream, mayonnaise, blue cheese, and spices

FRENCH DRESSING: salad dressing usually made with oil, vinegar, and spices

HOUSE DRESSING: a specialty of a particular restaurant, not always the same

TO BE KIDDING: to be pretending, joking, fooling

ESCARGOTS: a French word for small snails usually cooked in a sauce of white wine, butter, garlic, and parsley

TO HAVE COURAGE: to be brave; to have strength

ENCOURAGE: to make someone feel better; to help someone feel he or she can do something

SLIMY: covered with a mucous secretion; slippery

SHELL: a hard or tough outer covering; a framework or exterior cover

Translate the dialogue into Russian
THE RESTAURANT
Sharon: I’m glad you suggested going out for dinner, but I’m a little nervous.

Fred: Why are you nervous?

Sharon: Well, to tell you the truth, I usually avoid going to fancy restaurants because I never

know what to order. The waiters and waitresses ask so many questions so fast that I

almost always end up ordering a hamburger. A hamburger is the one thing I

understand.



Fred: Hey, don’t be nervous. I’ll bail you out if you need help, but I’m sure you’ll do OK.

The most important thing is to take all the time that you need. Don’t let anyone rush

you. And don’t be afraid to ask questions. It’s OK to ask the waiter or waitress to

repeat what they’ve said if you don’t understand.



Sharon: OK. If this is all so easy and fun, why do I feel like I’m going to the dentist instead of

out to dinner?



Fred: Don’t be silly. Come on, you’ll have a good time, I promise. Trust me.
(Standing inside the restaurant)
Sharon: Boy, this sure looks fancy. I’ve never been to anyplace like this before. What do we

do now? Can we just go ahead and sit down somewhere?



Fred: Nope. We need to wait until someone comes and takes us to a table. The host or

hostess will ask how many of us there are, and if we want to sit in the smoking or

nonsmoking section.

Sharon: That’s great! I hate to sit next to smokers while I’m eating. Here comes someone

who looks like she knows what she’s doing.



Hostess: Good evening. Do you have reservations?

Fred: No, we don’t. It was a spur of the moment decision to go out to eat.

Hostess: That’s OK. We’re not too busy right now. It’s still pretty early. Are there just the

two of you for dinner?



Fred: Yes, just the two of us.

Hostess: Smoking or nonsmoking?

Fred: Nonsmoking, please.

Hostess: Come right this way. I can give you a nice table over here.
( Seated at a table )
Fred: Thanks. This is perfect!

Sharon: Boy, this restaurant sure looks fancy. Are you sure we’re in the right place?

Remember, I’m used to McDonald’s. This is a little out of my league.



Fred: Shhh. . . .Here comes out waitress.

Waitress: Good evening. How are you tonight?

Fred: Just fine, thanks.

Sharon: Good evening.

Waitress: My name is Mary. I’II be your waitress for this evening. Can I get you something

from the bar first?



Fred: No, thank you.

Waitress: OK. Let me tell you about tonight’s specials. Our fish is red snapper. It’s cooked in

a butter and garlic sauce with white wine and mushrooms. We also have pasta

primavera. It’s fettucine made with fresh vegetables served in a light cream sauce.

Here are your menus. I’II give you some time to look at them. The only thing

we’re all out of is the fresh salmon. I’II be back in a few minutes to take your

order.


Fred: OK. Thank you.
( Reading the menu )

Fred: What looks good, Sharon?

Sharon: Boy, There are so many things to choose from. I can’t make up my mind. It’s a lot

easier to order at McDonald’s



Fred: Take your time. As long as we’re still reading the menus, our waitress probably

won’t come bask to the table unless we make eye contact with her to show that we

need help. She’ll probably wait until we’ve closed our menus to come and take

our order.



Sharon: OK. Good. That gives me some time. What’s quiche?

Fred: Quiche is a pie made with milk and eggs. It sometimes has cheese, vegetables, or

bacon in it.



Sharon: That sounds pretty weird to me. What’s calamari?

Fred: Calamari is squid. It’s usually deep-fried like french fries.

Sharon: You mean the squid that swim around in the ocean and have all those tentacles

and look like little octopuses?



Fred: That’s right, you’ve god it!

Sharon: You mean people actually ear them? My grandfather used to use them as bait to

catch fish.



Fred: Sure, people eat ‘ em. You’d be surprised how good they are.

Sharon: No kidding?

Fred: No kidding. They’re really great. Trust me.

Sharon: OK. I’m feeling brave. I’ll try the calamari.

Fred: Good. I think I’ll order the red snapper.

Sharon: Are you going to have the complete dinner, or a la carte?

Fred: I’m starving. I think I’ll get the whole dinner. How about you?

Sharon: The whole dinner comes with soup and salad, a drink, and dessert. Hmmm……I

don’t think I’m hungry enough for that much food. I’ll just order a la carte. It

looks like that still comes with soup or salad.

Fred: OK. Now all we’ve got to do is close our menus and wait for the waitress to come

back.


Sharon: Yeah. Here comes the hard part. This is where she asks all of the fast questions.

Fred: Shhh…. Here she comes. I’ll help you, remember?

Sharon: Have you decided?

Fred: Sharon?

Sharon: Yes. I’d like the calamari a la carte, please.

Waitress: You have your choice of soup or salad.

Sharon: Ummm…salad, please.

Waitress: Tossed green, or spinach?

Sharon: What’s the difference?

Waitress: The tossed green is made with lettuce, and the spinach is made with spinach. The

spinach salad has chopped hard-boiled eggs and crisp bacon in it, and

it’s tossed with an oil and vinegar dressing. It’s pretty good.

Sharon: OK…. I think I’ll try the spinach salad.

Waitress: Would you like french fries, mashed, or baked potato?

Sharon: French fries, please.

Waitress: What would you like to drink?

Sharon: Do you have tea?

Waitress: Yes, we do. Would you like black or herb tea?

Sharon: I’ll have a cup of black tea, please.

Waitress: OK. Have you decides, sir?

Fred: Yes. I’d like the red snapper dinner, please.

Waitress: You get soup and salad. Would you like tossed green, or spinach?

Fred: Tossed green.

Waitress: Thousand Island, blue cheese, French, ranch, or house dressing?

Fred: What’s your house dressing?

Waitress: It’s our specialty. It’s an oil and vinegar dressing with herbs.

Fred: What’s the ranch dressing?

Waitress: The ranch is a creamy garlic dressing.

Fred: That sounds good. And I’ll have a backed potato, please.

Waitress: Butter, or sour cream and chives?

Fred: Can I have all three?

Waitress: Sure. What would you like to drink?

Fred: I’ll just have a glass of water without ice.

Waitress: OK, fine. I’ll be back in a minute with your soup and salads.
(Later, during dinner)
Sharon: Hey, my food’s great! You were right about the calamari. They’re delicious!

Fred: Good. I’m glad you’re enjoying them. My red snapper is pretty good, too. Do

you want a bite?



Sharon: Sure, just a taste. Mmmmm….the sauce is fantastic! I think I’ll order that next

time. Here, try the calamari.



Fred: Are you kidding? They’ve still got their legs on!

Sharon: You’re the one who told me that they were so good! Don’t you like them?

Fred: I’ve never had the courage to try them.

Sharon: Are you kidding? You rat! Next time we go out to dinner, I’m going to order

escargots for you.



Fred: What are escargots?

Sharon: Snails.

Fred: You mean those funny little bugs that crawl around the garden? The slimy ones in

the shells?



Sharon: You’d be surprised how good they are. Trust me.

Fred: OK, you win. I’ll taste your calamari.

Sharon: Now, aren’t they good?

Fred: Hey, you’re right. They are good. Can I have another bite? You can have some

more of my red snapper.



Sharon: No way. You’ll just have to wait until next time and order them yourself. You

know, Fred, I’m really glad I came. It was a lot easier than I thought it would be

to order dinner.

Fred: You did really well, too. It gets easier every time. Trust me.

Sharon: Now that’s encouraging.

Postlistening/Reading Questions


Answer in complete sentences.

1. Why doesn’t Sharon like to go to restaurants to eat?

___________________________________________________________________________

2. What does Sharon usually order when she goes out to eat?

___________________________________________________________________________

3. What does Fred tell Sharon when she says she’s nervous?

___________________________________________________________________________

4. When will the waitress come over to take their order?

____________________________________________________________________________

5. How did Sharon’s grandfather use squid?



____________________________________________________________________________

  1. What is the fish special?

____________________________________________________________________________

  1. What kind of salad dressing does Fred order?

____________________________________________________________________________

  1. What is quiche?

____________________________________________________________________________

  1. What does Sharon think about calamari?

____________________________________________________________________________
Vocabulary Building Sentences


First, underline the word or expression from the vocabulary list in the prelistening/reading section. Then write a new sentence, using the same word or expression. Follow the model.

model: I always end up with my big sister’s old clothes. I’d sure like something new

once in a while.


I never knew she’d end up marrying a movie star.


  1. I thought I’d have to talk to him all night! Thanks for bailing me out.

__________________________________________________________________________

  1. I’d like to ask that girl out on a date, but she’s out of my league.

__________________________________________________________________________

  1. Janet thinks I’m crazy because I do everything on the spur of the moment.

__________________________________________________________________________

  1. I wanted to buy strawberries, but the supermarket was all out of them.

__________________________________________________________________________

  1. All right! He’s finally got it! I didn’t think he’d ever understand that math problem.

__________________________________________________________________________

  1. I’m glad breakfast is ready. I’m starved!

__________________________________________________________________________

  1. You’re kidding! You’re not really getting married this summer, are you?

__________________________________________________________________________

  1. The weather has been very weird lately. Yesterday it was very hot, and today it’s freezing cold!

__________________________________________________________________________

Word Forms


Complete the following sentences with the correct word form.


hesitates hesitation hesitant
1. There was too much ____________________________________ in his voice. I don’t think

he really wants to go.


2. I am always __________________________________ when I meet new people.
3. There is a proverb in English that says: “He who _______________________ is lost.”
lie liar lying
1. I never know when she is ________________________________ or telling the truth.
2. Do you ever ________________________________ to your parents?
3. He is such a good _________________________________ that no one knows whether

lieve him or not.


starve starvation starving
1. Some people in the word die of _________________________________ even.
2. On some diets, you have to ___________________________________ yourself.
3. I was ______________________________! That’s why I ate all of the pots

when I got home from school.


brave bravely bravery
1. That war hero is well known for his ______________________________ in combat.
2. I am not very ________________________________ when I have to go to the dentist.
3. She fought ___________________________________for her country.
encouragement encourage encouraging
1. Fred’s teacher said his grades were very _____________________________________mester.
2. I think it’s great that his teacher gave him so much __________________________________.
3. My mother always _________________________________________ me to study harder.
courage courageous
1. An astronaut must be very _________________________________________to go into space.
2. How much ____________________________________ do you have?

Рекомендуемая литература:



1. Sharon Peters “On a roll” A conversation and listening text, 1991

2. В.К. Мюллер Новый Англо-Русский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2003.

3. В.К. Мюллер Русско-Английский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2002.

4. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. Longman. - 2001.



Практическое занятие 6. Chapter VI. “The Traffic ticket”.
Цель занятия: уметь отвечать на поставленные вопросы и выполнять практические задания, уметь проводить анализ прочитанного произведения
Методические рекомендации:

  1. Прочитайте и переведите текст.

  2. Выучите слова и выражения после текста в разделе Vocabulary.

  3. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Comprehension.

  4. Письменно выполните упражнения в разделе Word Study.

Содержание практического занятия:



1.VOCABULARY
Рекомендуемая литература:

1. Sharon Peters “On a roll” A conversation and listening text, 1991

2. В.К. Мюллер Новый Англо-Русский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2003.

3. В.К. Мюллер Русско-Английский словарь. М.: Русский язык – медиа. - 2002.

4. Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English. Longman. - 2001.




Практическое занятие 7. “ BUS STOP”.
Цель занятия: уметь отвечать на поставленные вопросы и выполнять практические задания, уметь проводить анализ прочитанного произведения
Методические рекомендации:

  1. Прослушайте и переведите диалог.

  2. Выучите слова и выражения после текста в разделе Vocabulary.

  3. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Comprehension.

  4. Письменно выполните упражнения в разделе Word Study.

  5. Устно выполните упражнения в разделе Speech Practice.

Содержание практического занятия:



General WarmUp Questions


Read the following before you begin. They will you to on the topic covered in this chapter.

When people travel, they like to do many different of things. Some like to ride around on public transportation to see the sights, some like to shop and to restaurants where they can sit and watch people and others like to go to galleries, concerts, and museums. Have you been to a museum? If so, where and when? What did you see? Have you been to a concert? If so, where was the concert and what kind of music did you hear? If you could spend a day at the beach or in a museum, which would you do and why? Did you ever go on a field trip with your classmates? If so, where did you go and when? Did you go by bus?


Prelistening / Reading Study Questions


Read the following questions before you listen to or read the dialogue. Take a few moments to think about them. They will help you understand the dialogue when you begin.

Where does Sharon want to go? Why doesn’t Fred want to take a taxi? What is the name of the street where Fred and Sharon are going? Who do they ask for help? How else could they have gotten help? When do they have to transfer? Do you think that they are in a strange city? If you think they are in a strange city, why do you think so? Why don’t they go to the museum?


Vocabulary
TO TAKEN IN: to go see; to look at

TO FORK OUT BIG BUCKS: to spend a lot of money

MA’AM: a contraction of madam; commonly used as a polite manner of address to a woman who is older than you are (Note: Ma’am is a more common manner of address in Southern dialects than in Northern dialects of American English.)

GRUMPY: to be unhappy or unpleasant

YELLOW PAGES: the part of the telephone book which has advertisements for businesses and services

TO TRANSFER: to send from one place to another

COULD’VE: could have (this is common in fast, casual speech. )

TAKE IT EASY: relax; calm down; don’t worry

TRAFFIC: movement of cars, buses, trucks, ships, planes, or other vehicles in or through a certain area

TO CONNECT WITH: to meet; to contact; to get together with

NOT TO WORRY: don’t worry

TO KICK BACK: to relax; to take it easy

A SEC: a second; a very short period of time (This pronunciation is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as a second.)

D’YA: do you (This is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as do you.)

GOTTA: (have) got to (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as got to.)

TO MAKE IT: to be on time; to get something gone or go somewhere when you want (in time)

WE’VE: we have (This is common in fast, casual speech)

TO LIVE AND LEARN: to learn more as you get older

TO BE ON THE SAFE SIDE: to be careful; to protect yourself

THERE’RE: there are (This expression is common in fast, casual speech. When you are writing, it should always be written as there are)

REMODELING: fixing something up; changing something to make it make it better, newer, more convenient

BUS STOP
Sharon: hey, this is a great place, huh?

Fred: yeah, I guess so. But remember, this was your idea, not mine. I guess I’m ready to take in the art museum.

Sharon: great. Let’s take a cab.

Fred: come on, that’s too expensive. I’m not going to fork out big bucks for a cab. We’ll take a city bus.

Sharon: but we don’t know how the buses run here.

Fred: well, it should be easy enough to find out.

Sharon: we could ask that bus driver over there, I guess.

Fred: not that one. He’s a Greyhound driver. We need a city bus driver. Here’s one. Excuse me, ma’am. Could you tell us how to get to Pacific and Fifth?

Driver: you take the 55 and transfer to the 103 at Pacific. The 55 runs every 15 minutes, and the 103 runs on the half – hour. You can get a schedule on the rack over there.

Fred: thank you, ma’am.

Driver: don’t mention it.

Sharon: she seemed a little grumpy.

Fred: you’d be grumpy too if people asked you the same questions day after day. We could have called the bus company and gotten the information we needed.

Sharon: yeah, but we didn’t know the name of the company.

Fred: we probably could’ve looked in the yellow pages under “Bus Lines”.

Sharon: well, live and learn. Hey! Here comes bus number 55. It’s right on time, too!


(Boarding the bus)
Driver: I can’t take your dollar bill. We only take exact change.

Sharon: oh, nuts I don’t have any change.

Fred: wait a sec. I know I’ve got it here somewhere.

Sharon: great! Say, driver, could you tell us when we get to Pacific Avenue? We’ve gotta change to another bus.

Driver: then you’re each going to need a transfer.

Fred: oh, that’s right. Thanks.

Sharon: boy! Look at all the traffic. We’ll be lucky if we can connect with the 103.

Fred: not to worry. Just kick back and enjoy the ride. It’s sure nice not to be driving for a change.

Sharon: but this is taking so much longer than I thought it would. I sure hope we make it on time.

Fred: take it easy, we’ll make it.

Driver: Jefferson Street. Next stop, Pacific Avenue.

Fred: oh. That’s us. Ours is the next stop.

Sharon: thank you, driver.
(Getting off the bus)
Fred: well, it looks like we’ve missed the 103.

Sharon: how d’ya know?

Fred: I just saw it go by.

Sharon: sometimes a driver can hold another bus by calling ahead on his telephone, if he knows someone needs it.

Fred: we’re a little too late for that. We should have thought to ask him to call ahead before we got off.

Sharon: It could be worse. We could be on our way to school or to work instead of the art museum.

Fred: that’s true, but if I were going to school or to work, I’d be in my car an I’d leave my house early just to be on the safe side. I hate being late, especially to class.

Sharon: I guess during the week there’re probably more running.

Fred: there sure are. They’re all listed here in the schedule. Hey, wait a minute. There’s a bus that goes to Pacific and Fifth every 45 minutes from the next corner. See? It’s right here in the schedule!

Sharon: fantastic! Let’s hurry so we don’t miss that one, too.

Fred: finally! There’s the museum. Do you see it? It’s right across the street.

Sharon: all right! We made it! Say, what’s that sing out in front?

Fred: it looks like…….oh, no. I can’t believe it. The sign says: “Museum Closed for Remodeling”.

Postlistening / Reading Questions

Answer in complete sentences




  1. Where does Sharon want to go?



  1. Why doesn’t Fred want to take a cab?



  1. What street are Fred and Sharon going to?



  1. Whom do they ask for help?



  1. How else could they have gotten help?



  1. When do they have to transfer?



  1. Do you think they are in a strange city? Why?



  1. Why don’t they go to the museum?


Vocabulary Building Sentences


First, underline the word or expression from the vocabulary list in the prelistening/ reading section. Then write a new sentence, using the same word or expression. Follow the model.

MODEL: I’d like to stay home today and just kick back.



We just kicked back all weekend.


  1. I want to take in that movie at the Del Mar.



  1. Did you have to fork out big bucks for that car?


  1. I’ll connect with you in the library at 10.



  1. If I finish my homework, I’ll try to make it to the party.



  1. I didn’t know you had been married four times! Well, you live and learn.



  1. I like to be on the safe side, so I go to the dentist for a checkup once a year.



Word Forms


Complete the following sentences with the correct word form.

grumpier grumpy grump




  1. My little brother is a ___________________________________.




  1. He is _______________________than I am.



  1. Even when I make him laugh, he’s still _____________________.

transferable transferring transfer




  1. Do you plan to __________________________ to UCSC?




  1. I hope all of my classes are _________________________.



  1. My friend is _________________ to San Jose State in the fall.


Conversation Activities


Working in groups, discuss the following

Some people think bus drivers have a hard job. Do you agree? Are most bus drivers nice to their passengers? What is it like to travel in a strange city? Have you ever gotten lost? If you have, how did it make you feel? Should people ride buses instead of drive cars?

Sometimes when we don’t want to do something and someone talks us into doing it, we have more fun than we would have. Has this ever happened to you? Have you been to an art gallery or museum? Where was it, and what did you see? Was it your idea to go, or was it someone else’s idea? Did you ever plan to go somewhere and find out that the place was closed? If so, where was it and when?
Suggested Role – Plays

Working in groups or in pairs, prepare a dialogue to share with the class. The following topics are suggestions for you to use.








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